Course Outline
Faculty of Education and Arts

Course Number ESOC 2152




Course Title: Social Studies Methods and Concepts for primary Teachers

Course Developer: Kevin G. Tucker

Credits: 3

Section: 1

Semester: 2011-2

Cass Meeting Times Tuesday/Thursday- 7:00 – 8:15p.m.

Class Venue: Room 124

Pre-requisites: Teaching Methods EDUC 1402

Co-requisites None

Office Location FEA- E-106 – Belize City

Office Hours: Monday/Wednesday 4:00 – 5:15pm or by appointment
(Consultation Hours)

Telephone: Office: 2230256 Ext. 220,
E-Mail Address: ktucker@ub.edu.bz

Resources

Required Text: Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a
constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.

Recommended Text:/s
King, R., Morris, P., Morrissey, M. & Robinson, P.(2000). Social studies through
discovery. Chalkboard Press.

Farris, P.J. (2004). Elementary & middle social studies: An interdisciplinary
,multicultural approach. New York: McCraw-Hill

Martorella, P.H. ( 1994 ). Social studies for elementary school children: Developing
young citizens. New York: Mcmillian Publishing Company

National Geographic ( 2001 ). Peoples of the world. Washington D.C.: National
Geographic Society

Shoman, A. (2000). 13 chapters of a history of Belize. Belize City: The Angelus Press.

The Constitution of Belize: **http://www.belizelaw.org/e_library/constitution.html**




COURSE DESCRIPTION

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Social Studies methodology is built on the constructivist philosophy. In this course, student teachers will be exposed to strategies that will help them to develop lessons where they directly involve the learner. They will also tie in overviews of local and regional history, geography, culture and political science. This course is designed to provide interaction with the National Comprehensive Primary School Curriculum. Conceptual knowledge, critical thinking, social skill development and positive self-esteem will be promoted. It will equip student teachers with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to effectively plan for learning and delivery of the curriculum.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Upon completion of this course, student teachers will be able to:

Knowledge
  1. a. Incorporate local, national and global issues to effectively facilitate learning.
  2. b. Examine the impact of social studies using local and regional perspectives.
  3. c. Understand, develop, and apply the role of concepts, generalizations, hypotheses, and problem solving in social studies.
  4. d. Explain the importance of promoting democratic ideals.
  5. e. Explain the interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary nature of social studies.
  6. f. Define social studies
  7. g. Understand the organization and function National Primary School Social Studies Curriculum and its accompanying resources.
    1. h. Locate and define Belize, the Caribbean and Central America
    2. i. Describe characteristic features of society and culture in Belize and the region
    3. j. Describe and explain the physical and environmental features that shaped Belize and the region
    4. k. Develop an awareness of how the following factors (regionalization, integration, globalization, climate change) affects Belize and the regions
    5. l. Know and understand the various social studies disciplines and of topics and themes contained in the National Primary School Curriculum
    6. m. Know and understand the vocabulary of social studies disciplines, in particular, terms relating to society, culture, geography, geology, history, politics, democracy, economics, diversity and ethnicity


Skills
  1. a. Research current best practices to complement social studies instruction.
  2. b. Explain and recognize the rights and responsibilities of the family, social groups, community and the nation.
  3. c. Demonstrate the ability to plan and deliver social studies lessons.
  4. d. Participate in and analyze their experience with a variety of instructional strategies.
  5. e. Identify a variety of instructional strategies for teaching social studies.
  6. f. Using inquiry skills to draw conclusions.
  7. g. Properly plan and conduct a field trip.
  8. h. Distinguish between primary and secondary resources.
  9. i. Develop thematic units using the integrated approach to plan meaningful lessons.
  10. a. Use appropriate techniques to assess student learning Evaluate how development in Belize and the region is influenced by political, economic, social, cultural, environmental, and technological factors
  11. b. Analyze factors that have shaped Belize and the region and determind how such factors have influenced their own lives and that of the community in which they live
  12. c. Read and interpret maps
  13. d. Collect, interpret and present data using surveys and other forms of data collection techniques

  1. e. Apply social and intellectual skills and abilities in making decisions and responding to challenges in their personal lives



Attitudes
  1. a. Demonstrate tolerance and respect.
  2. b. Develop civic responsibility.
  3. a. Show appreciation for democratic ideals
  4. b. Develop a respect for other cultures and for their contribution to local and regional development
  5. c. Develop an appreciation of the importance of dealing justly and equitably with other groups and individuals


MODES OF INSTRUCTION

In this course we will utilize the following methodologies:

  • On line and face to face discussions
  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Guest speakers
  • Peer instructions
  • Field experience
  • Group work
  • Collaborative teaching
  • Comparative learning strategies
    • Web quest


Class Schedule
Date
Course Content
Objectives
Methods, & Activities
Readings Assignments and Due Dates
Resources
Wk1

Course introduction

Class expectations and goals

Definition, role and purpose of Social Studies

Meaningful Social Studies
Define social studies (8.4)

Explain the interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary nature of social studies. (8.5, 8.12)
-Describe the characteristics of social studies
- Explain the importance of understanding students’ prior knowledge about the social students content and skills to be taught
-
In pairs, exchange, look and discuss with each other the collage then give a 1 min presentation of your classmates using the collage.
PowerPoint presentation of the course outline and expectations
Whole class discussion on course outline
Video introduction to Socratic seminars
Small group discussion of what Socratic seminar is and presentations of key points
http://nwabr.org/sites/default/files/learn/ethicsprimer/SocSem.pdf
Organize students into presentation groups for their major presentations in the semester

Video on Service-Learning
Discuss the Service-Learning Project
Lecturer PowerPoint presentation on Chapter 1-“Meaningful Social Studies and the students”
From:Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a
constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Lecturers PowerPoint presentation on “Teaching for Meaningful Learning in Social Studies” From:Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a
constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Student Preparation Prior to Class Sessions:
Review course outline and expectations
Create a collage of yourself using pictures and words and bring to class- see appendix #1

Research the views of the following constructivist theorist for next class:

Jean Piaget, Vigotsky; David Ausubel; Novak



ASSIGNMENT DUE:
IMAGE COLLAGE on first Face to Face meeting
How to Conduct Successful Socratic Seminars: a video series for the classroom teacher video/CD
http://nwabr.org/sites/default/files/learn/ethicsprimer/SocSem.pdf
The Power of Service-learning video/CD
http://www.epa.gov/osw/education/pdfs/svclearn.pdf
Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Wk 2 +3
Constructivist theory
- Vigotsky
- David Ausubel, Jean Piaget, Novak
Behavioral Learning theory
  • Direct teaching
  • Explicit teaching
  • Expository teaching
  • Teacher-led instruction



Primary School Curriculum of Social Studies Curriculum standards


-
Know and understand the various social studies disciplines and of topics and themes contained in the National Primary School Curriculum (8.1, 8.5)
-
Review the presentation on the Constructivist approach
groups discussion :the constructivist approach of Jean Piaget, Vigotsky, David Ausubel and Novak - Each group will select a facilitator to moderate the session smoothly.
In groups of 5 students will discuss the Behavioral Learning Theory and discuss with whole group
In groups, students will be given a division (lower;middle;upper) of the SocialStudies Curriculum to analyze:
What is the main purpose of the curriculum?
What are the main standards to be met
What themes should be
What are the topics under each theme
Students will use the online forum to address these questions

Key goals of Social Studies- Group discussion
Student Preparation Prior to this Class Session:
Research the views of the following constructivist theorist for next class: Jean Piaget, Vigotsky; David Ausubel; Novak
Review the Primary School curriculum for lower, Middle and Upper divisions
ASSIGNMENT: Write a 2 page refection (double spaced)paper on two of the constructivist theorist views- Follow APA documentation style


Compare and Contrast the traditional and Constructivist teaching methods. Which one works best for you and our students? Why?

Socratic Seminar #1
Theory of Curriculum and curriculum development: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pklZxG2YLnA&feature=related

What is Curriculum: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IGTjrYOUYE&feature=related

Curriculum and Instructions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-iAX78jNQE&feature=related

The Constructivist Learning Theory http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALWwY63r4R4&feature=related

Constructivist vs traditional classroom:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEsGHVdVkMw&feature=related

Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: aconstructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Wk4

Inquiry skills
-forming generalizations
-types of generalizations


construct concepts

-
Understand, develop, and apply the role of concepts, generalizations, hypotheses, and problem solving in social studies. (8.4)
Using inquiry skills to draw conclusions. (8.8)
-describe the types of skills needed by students to develop meaningful social studies learning.
-describe the process of teaching social studies inquiry skills
-describe methods for assessing social studies inquiry skills during a lesson
-indentify and classify different types of concepts
-identify and classify different levels of abstraction between concepts

Demonstrate the ability to plan and deliver social studies lessons. (8.11, 8.14)
-
Lecturer’s presentation on how to help students develop inquiry skills
Group discussion follows on the following:Review the lesson plan “Productive Resources” on page 160-162) from Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a
constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Reflect on the following questions:
What concepts and sub concepts are the primary focus of this lesson?
What makes the presentation of the concept and its sub concepts appropriate for elementary students?
What examples and non examples are provided in the lesson?
List at least two critical attributes, presented for the concept and each of its sub concepts in the lesson.
How is the concept applied in the expansion phase, and how is its use expanded to contexts beyond that in which it was learned during the development phase?
Student Preparation Prior to Class Sessions:
Read chapter 4 of:
Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a
constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Using Social Studies to teach Inquiry Skills: http://www.ehhs.cmich.edu/~tcsrj/newbyhiggs6.pdf

Helping Students develop Social Studies Inquiry Skills: http://wps.ablongman.com/wps/media/objects/4157/4256860/table%203_2a.pdf
Read chapter 5 of:
Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: a constructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Helping students construct concepts


Reflection Paper #:

Describe 3 Social Studies inquiry skills and reflect how you can use them as part of your lesson
Due End of Week

Socratic Seminar #2

Field Trip (Museum of Belize)
Power Point presentation: Helping students develop Social Studies Inquiry Skills


PowerPoint presentation: Helping students construct concept
Wk 5-7

Overview of Geography of Belize , Central America and the Caribbean + Methods of teaching Geograhpy

Defining geography

Developing geography concepts

Helping students learn and use map and globe skills


Longitude and latitude
plates
Locate and define Belize, the Caribbean and Central America (8.1)

Describe and explain the physical and environmental features that shaped Belize and the region (8.1)
Know and understand the vocabulary of social studies disciplines, in particular, terms relating to society, culture, geography, geology, history, politics, democracy, economics, diversity and ethnicity (8.4)

Read and interpret maps (8.6)

Develop an awareness of how the following factors (regionalization, integration, globalization, climate change) affects Belize and the regions (8.2)
Participate in and analyze their experience with a variety of instructional strategies. (8.17)
Identify a variety of instructional strategies for teaching social studies. (8.13, 8.15, 8.17)

Properly plan and conduct a field trip. (8.10)
Group # 1: 30 minutes presentation on the geography of Belize, and 1 Central American or Caribbean nation
Groups # 2: 35 minutes presentation on the strategies and methodologies to teach geography
Socratic seminar on the Nora Parham case
Review lesson plan “People Change Their Environment” on page#4 09-4:11 in Sunal, E. C. & Hass, M. E. (2008). Social studies for the elementary and middle grades: aconstructivist approach. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc And refelection on the following:
Why do students quickly notice changes in the classroom set up for the expository introduction of the lesson?
What initial terms do you anticipate students association with the word environment?
What procedures would you use to prevent or solve the problem of students being curious about the pictures that other groups of students have?
Modifying the bulletin broad helps students reconstruct their ideas about the environment and changes in it. what other activity might you use to help illustrate students thoughts as they study?
Group prepare PowerPoint Presentations


Pico-Teaching


Field Trip (St John’s Cathedral)
Resources
Geography of Belize: **http://countrystudies.us/belize/16.htm**
Geography of Central America and the Caribbean: **http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_America**
Video of the lands of Belize
Wk8-10

Overview of the History of Belize, Central American and the Caribbean and Methods of Teaching History
Incorporate local, national and global issues to effectively facilitate learning.( 8.2)
Distinguish between primary and secondary resources. (8.9)
Know and understand the vocabulary of social studies disciplines, in particular, terms relating to society, culture, geography, geology, history, politics, democracy, economics, diversity and ethnicity (8.4)

Participate in and analyze their experience with a variety of instructional strategies. (8.17)
Identify a variety of instructional strategies for teaching social studies. (8.13, 8.15,8.17)
Major learning activities
Group #3 Group PowerPoint presentations on the history of Belize, Students can use audio visual, maps, and other visual to assist
Group#4 PowerPoint presentations brief history of Belize and choose ca + the Caribbean. Then choose one Central American or Caribbean country
Group #5 Group PowerPoint presentation on the methods and strategies that can be used to teach geography
PlanField trip to Caracol/xuantunich/ ni
Student preparation and prior class sessions
Read Chapter 8
Group #3 prepares powerPoint presentations on the history of Belize, Students can use audio visual, maps, and other visual to assist
Group#4 Prepare powerpoint presentations brief history of Central America + the Caribbean. Then choose one Caribbean + one Central American country
Group #5 will prepare a pretzi presentation on the methods and strategies that can be used to teach geography
Assignment: Plan Field trip for your class following the posted field trip guide.
Pico Teaching(with lesson plans + reflections)

Socratic Seminar # 3
Video- History of Belize
A History in the Belize: A nation in the Making: **http://www.belizenet.com/history.html**
Wk11-13

Overview of present systems of government and a close examination on the state of governance in the region and Methods of Teaching Political Science

Examine the impact of social studies using local and regional perspectives. (8.3)
Explain the importance of promoting democratic ideals. (8.2)
Know and understand the vocabulary of social studies disciplines, in particular, terms relating to society, culture, geography, geology, history, politics, democracy, economics, diversity and ethnicity (8.4)
Participate in and analyze their experience with a variety of instructional strategies. (8.17)
Identify a variety of instructional strategies for teaching social studies. (8.13, 8.15, 8.17)
Group 6 presentations on political systems in Belize and in the region. Also, research on the political history of Belize and Central America

Group # 7 presentation information on the different methods to teach political science- see student text

Lecturer’s presentation on the history of Belize Constitution

In groups students will be given sections of the constitution to review and discuss. Each group is going to make short presentations on the main features in their section. Discussion ensues
Student preparation and prior class sessions:
Group 6 prepare presentations on political systems in Belize and in the region. Also, research on the political history of Belize and Central America
Group # 7 research information on the different methods to teach political science- see student text
Review chapters of the constitution of Belize
Field Trip (Lamani/Cahal Pech)


Visit to the National Assembly

Guest speaker( the Clerk of the House of Representatives)
PowerPoint presentation on the constitution of Belize
Constitutional and Political Structures Prior to Independence:
http://countrystudies.us/belize/62.htm
Parliamentary System of Government:
http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Parliamentary+system
Political History of Belize:
http://www.belize.gov.bz/ct.asp?xItem=429&CtNode=377&mp=27
Belize Government and Politics:
http://countrystudies.us/belize/61.htm
Belize Government Institutions:
http://countrystudies.us/belize/73.htm
Belize Political Dynamics:
http://countrystudies.us/belize/74.htm
Systems of Government: http://chartsbin.com/view/6kx
Political systems: http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/street/pl38/sect2.htm
Ideas for teaching government:
http://www.ehow.com/list_6495441_ideas-teaching-government.html
Wk7

Overview of the characteristics of society and culture in Belize, the Caribbean and Central America (and the African influence) and Methods of teaching Society and Culture
Develop an understanding of the factors which influenced the evolution of Belizean and regional society and culture (8.2)

Describe characteristic features of society and culture in Belize and the region (8.1)

Know and understand the vocabulary of social studies disciplines, in particular, terms relating to society, culture, geography, geology, history, politics, democracy, economics, diversity and ethnicity (8.4)

Explain and recognize the rights and responsibilities of the family, social groups, community and the nation. (8.16)
Apply social and intellectual skills and abilities in making decisions and responding to challenges in their personal lives (8.16)

Participate in and analyze their experience with a variety of instructional strategies. (8.17)
Identify a variety of instructional strategies for teaching social studies. (8.13, 8.15, 8.17)
Group 8 presentations on the culture and society of Belize, one Central American and one Caribbean country
  • language, patterns of consumption, creative expressions (festival, music, arts, culinary practices), sports, religion, the media and economic characteristics such as tourism.
Group presentation on the methods for teaching society and culture :
  • Literature based approaches
  • Debates and mature exchange of ideas
  • Exploration of change and continuity (impact of education, glodalization and religion on culture)
  • Teacher/student as a scholor
  • Music
  • The visual arts (illustrations)
Socratic seminar:
Group 8 prepare presentations on the culture and society of Belize, one Central American and one Caribbean country
language, patterns of consumption, creative expressions (festivamusic, arts, culinary practices), sports, religion, the media and economic characteristics such as tourism.
Group 8 prepares presentation on the methods for teaching society and culture :
  • Literature based approaches
  • Debates and mature exchange of ideas
  • Exploration of change and continuity (impact of education, glodalization and religion on culture)
  • Teacher/student as a scholor
  • Music
The visual arts (illustrations)
NANO- Teaching (with lesson plans + Reflections)
History and culture of Belize:**http://www.ize2belize.com/belize/facts/culture.html**
Countries and their cultures: **http://www.everyculture.com/A-Bo/Belize.html**
Maya Culture in Belize : **http://worldstogethertravel.com/belize/quich-culture.htm**
Cultures in Belize: **http://www.enjoy-belize.com/culture.htm**
Caribbean Society and Culture PowerPoint presentation
Culture and society in Central America:**http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_America**
Wk8

Social Studies Assessment and Evaluation

Use appropriate techniques to assess student learning (8.17)
-explain the differences between assessment and evaluation
- differentiate between informal and formal assessments and evaluation
-analyze and try writing rubrics appropriate for assessing projects and essays
-Describe how reflection and an action research can help guide your development as a professional
Forum discussion on lesson plan: identifying assessments within a lesson plan “Making Good Rules” (page 85-88- Social Studies for the Elementary and Middle Grades: A Constructivist Approach)
Group discussion Questions based on the lesson plan:
Do the formative assessments in the lesson assist the teacher in tracking students’ progress toward constructing the lesson’s major concepts?
Does the formative assessment in the expansion phase enable the teacher to identify whether students are applying the concepts?
Does the summative evaluation enable the teacher to determine how well each student has constructed the major concepts of the lesson?
Develop and create: Progress Report Form for social studies + Check list
Student Preparation Prior to Class Sessions:
Study the PowerPoint slides, “Helping students learn through multiple assessments and evaluation”
Review Chapter 3 in your text
Review “Authentic Assessment of Social Studies” http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MI_Auth_12350_7.AssmtMan.pdf


Reflection : Explain the use of:
  • Individual portfolios
  • Interviews
  • Classroom websites
  • Journals
  • Quality Circles
Self evaluation reports
Authentic Assessment of Social Studies

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MI_Auth_12350_7.AssmtMan.pdf
Wk 14-15
Face to face on Week 15

Planning Social Studies Lessons and Units
Apply knowledge of engaged learning, social studies curriculum standards, and a curriculum planning framework to plan a new unit.
Understand the organization and function National Primary School Social Studies Curriculum and its accompanying resources. (8.1, 8.5)

Know and understand the various social studies disciplines and of topics and themes contained in the National Primary School Curriculum (8.1, 8.5)

Demonstrate the ability to plan and deliver social studies lessons. (8.11, 8.14)
In groups students will create unit plan for a 3 weeks for lower, middle or upper division using the theme of World and any topic
Create a unit plan in specific social studies content area using the “Planning Framework” with these items completed (handout for groups). The unit should be based on the engaged learning goal, and should incorporate some web resources that students will use in completing the unit:

  • Title
  • Level
  • Brief Description
  • Goals
  • Major Learning Activities
  • Materials and Resources (3 subcategories)
  • Assessment
Group micro teach for 15 mins each
Student preparation and prior class sessions
Review the sample unit plan
Review the sample lesson plan
Review the manual
Prepare to teach a 15 min lesson






Unit and Lesson plan due

Groups of 3micro teach for 15 mins each

Wk116

Exam-e-Portfolio
Service-Learning Social

EXAM WEEK

Portfolio set up using:
http://www.wikispaces.com/

CLASS SCHEDULE


METHODS OF ASSESSMENT

Methods of assessment may include tests, portfolios, projects, labs, quizzes, presentations, developmental activities, reports, and worksheet activities, readings, paper/essay/research. [Modify to accommodate your course]

COURSE POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

The administration of student discipline in the university community is a responsibility shared by students, faculty, and administrative staff. The University of Belize Academic Honesty Policy outlines the University’s expectations for the integrity of student’s academic work, the procedures for resolving alleged violations of those expectations, and the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty throughout the process. All students are expected to conform to the Academic Honesty Policy. Lecturers are expected to consult with academic department chairpersons to prevent and respond to violations of the Academic Honesty Policy. Students wishing to dispute a charge of academic dishonesty or a sanction made upon them because of such allegations can do so by appealing to the Dean of Student Affairs to invoke the Discipline Appeals Process as detailed in the Student Handbook. (Please visit www.ub.edu.bz for a full description of violations to the Academic Honesty Policy and sanctions.)
STUDENT EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTION: ONLINE MECHANISM

Students are advised that they are free to submit comments on line in respect to any course they are registered in during the semester (as opposed to waiting for the end of the semester). Students are assured that since there is no need to log in to access the facility available on the UB web page www.ub.edu.bz their comments will be anonymous. The comment(s) will go to the Quality Assurance Office that in turn will forward the comments to the relevant Dean for timely action.


CLASS POLICIES

  1. CLASS ATTENDANCE: Students are expected to attend all sessions, and to be on time. Students must attend at least 80% of class sessions. Unexcused absences beyond this point may result in a reduction in your grade. You must provide the necessary documentation for any other absences e.g. doctors certificate if you are ill. You are expected to participate fully in class discussions and come to class prepared to contribute to class discussions and group work. Because participation in class is imperative for success, each student’s final grade will be positively or negatively affected based upon the number of class sessions they attend. Absent students are responsible for obtaining class notes, handouts, and activities, as well as any other pertinent information. Points lost due to absences can be made up only through extra credit opportunities provided by the instructor.

  1. PUNCTUALITY: Kindly make every effort to arrive on time to all sessions. Walking into a session late is unprofessional and distracting to the rest your colleagues. If you will be late for any session, please inform the instructor via an e-mail, telephone call, or text message.

  1. PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS: In your fieldwork and/or class activities, you are expected to conduct yourself in an ethical, legal, and professional manner.

  1. READINGS: Readings will be assigned. You will be expected to attend the class session prepared to discuss the readings from the required text and/or any additional readings assigned. The aim is to enhance your understanding and skills related to these materials and to enable you to share your understanding with class members.

  1. WRITINGS: The ability to write clearly and effectively is essential to a profession. Written assignments represent your best professional abilities and excellence. Assignments must be written in Standard English. Written assignments should be typed and carefully proofread. Pages that are disorganized and contain errors in grammar, spelling, syntax, or typing will receive reduced grades. All written work should adhere to the APA /MLA style as directed by the instructor.

  1. CELL PHONES: As courtesy to your classmates and instructor, please have cell phones turned off throughout class time. If an urgent matter arises that requires you to have your cell phone on (on vibrate), please inform the instructor before the session.


  1. MISSED OR LATE ASSGINMENTS: Students are expected to do all class assignments, and turn them in on time. If prior approval for late assignment is not granted by the instructor, points will be deducted from that assignment or the assignment will not be accepted. Assigned readings must be completed prior to the class for which they are intended.



  1. TECHNOLOGY: Students are required to utilize word processing programs to complete all assignments. Internet and electronic mail systems will be used as needed to develop strategies, facilitate class discussion, and enhance communication between professor and students.


GRADING SCALE
The final grade will be assigned in adherence with the University of Belize’s Grade Policy. Thus, final grades will be computed using a combination of semester grades (including home work assignments), essays, tests and quizzes, portfolios etc, and a final examination. The final letter grade will be assigned using the following University Grading Scale:

95-100 A 80-84 B 65-69 D+
90-94 A- 75-79 C+ 60-64 D
85-89 B+ 70-74 C 0-59 F

CLASS ACTIVITIES AND ASSIGNMENTS

ASSESSMENT:

Socratic Seminars 10%
Reflection/Summary Papers 10%
Group presentations 10%
Field trip plans + execution 10%
Pico Teaching 5%
Nano-Teaching 5%
Service-Learning Project 15%
Unit plan/lesson plans 10%
Micro teaching 10%
Electronic Portfolio (Wiki Spaces.com) 15%
Total 100%

1. Assignment 1: Blogs/Reflection paper – Due Date: Week #, (through specific date)
This assignment requires you to respond to statements, articles, methodologies, etc, place on the instructor’s blog website. After responding, each student must make comments to two of their peer’s blog comments. Responds and comments must be logical, academic and follows Standard English rules.
Reflection Papers- This assignment requires you to write a 2 page reflection on specific text chapters, theories, and lesson plans. Requirements: cover paper; double line spacing; 12 font letter; time new Romans

GRADING CRITERIA
NAME OF ASSIGNMENT 1
Worth points
Forum Rubric

Exemplary
Accomplished
Non-compliant
Think




Consistently posts ideas that
Usually posts ideas that show a
Most posts are only loosely

show a clear connection to the
clear connection to the assigned
connected to assigned readings.

assigned readings and a
readings and a thoughtful
Thinking appears superficial and

thoughtful reflection on these
reflection on these readings
without personal reflection on

Readings

the material
Collaborate




Consistently posts ideas that
Meets minimal posting
Does not meet minimal posting

show a clear analysis of others’
requirements. Usually offers a
requirements. Does not

posts. Offers ideas that help to
thoughtful response to others’
participate in on-going

continue the discussion
ideas. Postings sometimes help
discussions.


to keep the discussion going.

Act




Consistently shows how the
Posts often include how the
Posts offer no evidence that

assigned readings and
assigned readings and
assigned readings and

discussions have influenced
discussions have influenced
discussions influenced current

current practices. Reports what
current practices.
practices.

changes have been made in the



classroom or in personal



thinking and how these changes



impact student learning.



2. Assignment 2: Socratic Seminars – Due Date: Week #, (specific date)
Students will be assigned relevant articles from journals, magazines, newspapers and texts based on Social studies issues. Whole group discussion on the particulars using the Socratic seminar protocol will be facilitated.

GRADING CRITERIA:
Socratic Seminars
Worth points

Rubric for Socratic Seminars

Indicator
4
3
2
1
Conduct
Demonstrates respect for
learning process
Exhibits patience w/
differing opinions
Asks peers for
clarification
Attempts to involve
others
Moves forward into new
concepts
Not disruptive/ control
of nonverbal gestures
Shows composure but
sometimes shows slight
impatience
Not patient while
waiting to speak
Demonstrates respectful
attitude toward others
Comments frequently
but does not involve
others
Shows a desire to
contribute responsibly to
the seminar
Participates verbally/
shows impatience w/
seminar process
May make insightful
comments but does so
sparingly
May be argumentative
and generally lacks poise
May be unfocused
because of depth/ length
of seminar
Shows no respect for
process
Argumentative and rude
Takes advantage of/
causes distractions
Arrives unprepared
Wants the floor for
himself
Writes personal notes
instead of seminar notes
Attempts to sleep during
Seminar
Speaking
Speaks to all
• Avoids talking too long
• Can be heard by all
• Avoids slang/incorrect
grammar
• Articulates clearly
• Pronounces words
accurately/extensive
vocabulary
Addresses majority of
comments to peers (not
leader)
Attempts to move
discussion to new idea
Does not try to say
“everything” while
speaking
Tries to speak louder
when asked to do so
Makes comments to
merit reaction
Speaks directly to leader
• Speaks too softly and
needs to be reminded
• Routinely lapses into use
of slang or substandard
usage
• Cannot pronounce key
words in text
• Speaks only with
prompting and has no
sustainable point
Reluctant to speak when
called on or passes
Mumbles/mispronounces
words
Cannot be heard at all
Shows absolutely no
desire to contribute
verbally
Reasoning
Understands questions
• Cites textual support
• Relates to other
reading/studies
• Expresses thoughts in
complete sentences
• Provides insightful
comments
• Resolves contradictory
ideas
• Considers all sources
and input
Responds to questions
w/out any prompting
Demonstrates some
reflection on text but not
mastery
Makes limited
connections w/ideas of
others
Somewhat relates own
ideas to other
readings/seminars
Uses quotes/ paraphrases
but inferences under-
developed
Makes comments to
merit reaction
May have read text but
limited preparation
• May overlook important
points, thus leading to
faulty logic
• May be accurate on
minor points while
missing main concept
• Contributes opinions that
have no textual support
• Has some difficulty in
formulating
understanding comments
Makes illogical
comments
Says no more than, “I
agree.”
Ignores previous
comments and semina
direction
Uses humor to avoid
serious thinking
Listening
Listens for opportunities
to respond
• Does not overlook
details
• Takes notes/writes
questions
• Avoids repetitive
remarks
• Builds on discussion
• Points out flawed
reasoning
• Overcomes any
Distractions
Is generally attentive and
focused
Responds thoughtfully to
ideas/ questions raised
May be too absorbed in
own thoughts to hear
others’ comments
May write down some
thoughts but not
consistently
Responds only to ideas
that are personally
interesting
• Asks for repetition of
questions or rephrasing
of questions
• Takes very limited notes
• Easily distracted or may
be source of distraction
• Does not look up the text
as it is cited
• Does not visibly respond
to cited text
Not attentative to others
Exhibits negative body
language
Makes comments
showing total
misrepresentation of
material
Does not listen well to
understand others’ points
Takes no notes
Reading
Passes a reading
comprehension test
• Is familiar w/text
• Has marked text or has a
note sheet
• Understands major
concepts in the reading
• Identifies and
contradictions in the
readings
Passes a reading
comprehension test
Has marked text or
prepared notes
Can locate most
references in text
Demonstrates knowledge
of facts, but lacks
mastery of concepts
Acknowledges difficulty
w/reading and asks for
clarification
Appears to have
skimmed selection/
knows minimum on quiz
• has little or no marking
of text/ scanty notes
• confused about key
concepts
• makes comments that
reflect shallow
knowledge
clearly unprepared and
fails reading quiz
• Unfamiliar with text
• Has no notes or marking
or text
• Asked for no help with
the reading




3. Assignment 3: Group presentations – Due Date week #, (specific date)
In groups of 4, students will be assigned specific topics from the text; topics pertaining to content in social studies (History, geography, political science, culture, etc) and topics on methodology) Each group is going to present the specific topics in a clear and concise manner; using Pretzi presentation digital medium. Each presentation will be for 15 minute long.


GRADING CRITERIA:
Socratic Seminars
Worth points

Rubric for Presentation

Categories
Exceptional (6)
Admirable (5)

Acceptable (4)

Amateur (3)

Organization

Extremely well organized; logical format that was easy to follow; followed smoothly from one idea to another and cleverly conveyed; the organization enhanced the effectiveness of the presentation
Presented in a thoughtful manner; there were signs of organization and most transitions were easy to follow, but at times ideas were unclear.
Somewhat organized; ideas were not presented coherently and transitions were not always smooth, which at times distracted the audience
Choppy and confusing; format was difficult to follow; transitions of ideas were abrupt and seriously distracted the audience.
Content Accuracy
Completely accurate; all facts were precise and explicit
Mostly accurate; a few inconsistencies or errors in information
Somewhat accurate; more than a few inconsistencies or errors in information.
Completely inaccurate; the facts in this project were misleading to the audience.
Impact on Education
Significant discussion impact on education, articulating ideas and using examples to further develop discussion
Some discussion on impact on education. Use of examples to show understanding.
Impact on education identified but no significant discussion
Little articulation of ideas and examples
No identification of impact on education

Research

Went above and beyond to research information; brought in personal ideas and information to enhance project; and utilize more than four types of resources to make project effective.
Did a very good job of researching; utilized materials provided to their full potential; solicited more than three types of resource to enhance project.
Use the material provided in an acceptable manner, but did not consult any additional resources.
Did not utilize resources effectively; did little or no fact gathering on the topic.

Creativity

Was extremely clever and presented with originality; a unique approach that truly enhanced the project.
Was clever at times; thoughtfully and uniquely presented
Added a few original touches to enhance the project but did not incorporate it throughout.
Little creative energy used during this project; was bland, predictable.
Presentation Mechanics
Was engaging, provocative, and captured the interest of the audience and maintained this throughout the entire presentation; great variety of visual aids and multimedia; visual aids were attractive and clear.
Was well done and interesting to the audience; was presented in a unique manner and was very well organized; some use of visual aids.
Was at times interesting and was presented clearly and precisely; was clever at times and was organized in a logical manner; limited variety of visual aids and visual aids were not attractive and clear.
Was not organized effectively; was not easy to follow and did not keep the audience interested; no use of visual aids.



4. Assignment 4: Field trip plans– Due Date: Week #, (specific date)
In groups, students will plan 5 field trips with all the protocols needed and execute the trips. Each group is responsible to carry out/lead their respective field trips.
These trips can include: Museum of Belize’s John’s Cathedral & Yarbrough Cemetery; horse & Carriage tour of Belize city;Caracol, xunantunich, Cahal Pech, Mountain Pine Ridge, half moon Caye or Cockscomb basin; The River Valley communities; The National Assembly;


GRADING CRITERIA:
Field Trip
Worth points 6%

PLANNING A SOCIAL STUDIES TRIP RUBRIC

Categories
Exceptional
4
Exemplary
3
Very Good
2
Good
1
Unacceptable
0
Social Studies Related
Exceptional
Idea is clearly relevant to Social Studies and includes additional novel ideas and is clearly evident in written proposal.
Exemplary
Idea is relevant to Social Studies and is evident in written proposal.
Very Good
Idea is relevant to Social Studies, and most is shown in written proposal.
Good
Idea is somewhat relevant to Social Studies, some aspects not shown in written proposal.
Unacceptable
Idea is not relevant to Social Studies and is not shown to be relevant in written proposal.
Engaging/Interesting Idea
Exceptional
Idea will absolutely be fun, interesting and engaging.
Exemplary
Idea will probably be fun or interesting.
Very Good
Most activities will be fun or interesting.
Good
Idea is engaging
Unacceptable
Idea is not fun, interesting or engaging.
Logistics
Exceptional
Plan accounts for all aspects of food, transportation, duration, chaperones, and costs plus takes into account additional aspects of a field trip, with no errors.
Exemplary
Plan accounts for all of the aspects of food, transportation, duration, chaperones, and cost.
Very Good
Plan accounts for most of the aspects of food, transportation, duration, chaperones, or cost, but is missing one aspect of the total field trip.
Good
Plan accounts for some of the aspects of food, transportation, duration, chaperones, or cost, but is missing several parts of the planning.
Unacceptable
Plan shows very little planning, major mistakes or is missing many apects of food, transportation, duration, chaperones, or cost.
Proposal
Exceptional
Proposal covers all information clearly and all sections of the forms are completed accurately with additional details.
Exemplary
Proposal covers all information and most sections of the forms are completed accurately.
Very Good
Proposal covers most information and forms are completed with few minor errors.
Good
Proposal covers some information and forms are completed with several errors.
Unacceptable
Proposal covers very little information and forms are incomplete.













5. Assignment 5: Unit plan/lesson plan – Due Date: Week #, (specific date)
In groups of three, students will construct a unit plan to reflect a specific level of the primary curriculum. Students will use a specific theme in Social Studies that covers lower, middle or upper levels in the primary curriculum. Students are required to write 2 lesson plans deducted from the unit plan.
GRADING CRITERIA:
Socratic Seminars
Worth points


UNIT PLAN RUBRIC
POWERFUL SOCIAL STUDIES
Unit Plan
Below Expectations (0-2.)
Meets Expectations (2.5-4)
Exceeds Expectations (4.5-5)
Comments
Objectives
Lesson objectives are vague and would be difficult to assess. Focused on activities rather than student learning. Relationship to Learner Outcomes is questionable.
Lesson objectives relate clearly to the lesson topic, grade, provincial outcomes, enduring understandings, and skills and processes. Are student-centered and focused on learning outcomes, not activities. Some higher order thinking expectations are present. Objectives are measurable.
All of “meets expectations” and:

Objectives are all measurable and include higher order (ex: Bloom’s taxonomy) expectations. Outcomes are clearly stated and highly worthwhile.

Activities
It is questionable whether activities would help students attain unit objectives or goals. Little to no variation in student activities or teaching approaches. Student activities require little or no higher level thinking or processing of information.
(i.e., promote higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy).
Would achieve unit objectives and unit goals. Clearly described. Varied and stimulating. Used a variety of teaching strategies such as: constructivism, historical thinking, geographical thinking, cooperative learning etc. Lesson plans include various student activities intended to engage students in a thoughtful and critical manner.
All of “meets expectations” and:

Activities are extremely well developed, engaging and creative. Teaching strategies employed demonstrate understanding of the effectiveness in teaching various aspects of social studies.

Resources
Little attempt to use a variety of resources throughout unit.
Included in each lesson. Students encounter a variety of resources, apart from their text. Appropriate to activities, lesson objectives and unit goals.
All of “meets expectations” and:

Innovative use of resources in evidence.

Development of Unit
Unit opener (first lesson) fails to establish purpose of unit or motivate students. Sequence of lessons and activities is poorly thought-out. Overly teacher-directed. Concepts and skills are vague or missing. Little to no attention to diverse learners/learning styles. Does not reflect constructivist teaching principles.
Opening lesson is motivating and establishes unit purposes. Sequence of activities is logical (prerequisite understandings and skills are taught at the appropriate times). Appropriate balance of student/teacher direction. Selected concepts and skills are appropriate to the unit and are taught throughout unit. Appropriate attention paid to diverse learners/learning styles. Is a “constructivist” unit.
All of “meets expectations” and:
Unit is extremely well developed, with careful thought given to beginning, middle and end. Concepts and skills lessons are integrated into the flow of the unit and are highly relevant. Highly sensitive to diverse learners/ learning styles. Highly constructivist in nature, and reflects principles in “A Vision for Powerful Teaching and Learning in SS”.

Consistency of Unit
Unit plan does not reflect unit rationale statement.
Unit plan reflects and is consistent with your unit rationale.
Unit plan is clearly developed in conjunction with unit rationale section; consistent attention given to all components.




6. Assignment- Pico-Teaching – Due date:

Pico –Teaching – These small teaching episodes (1 student teaching 3-4 peers) will consist of:
  1. 1. Pico- Teaching Lesson plans. Each member of the group would write lesson plan for teaching middle grade students (you may use the assignment done above). Be sure to identify the age level. You will share a copy with the other students in your group in hard copy. Include all parts of the lesson plan except differentiation and assessment.
  2. 2. Pico-Teaching. The Pico-teaching episode should last no more than 15 mins and be taught to the group. For efficient use of time, you may demonstrate the activity rather than having the “class” group do it. One person in the group should act as timekeeper.
  3. 3. Evaluation: Group members will evaluate each other’s teaching episodes using a rubric, providing constructive criticism using comments on what seemed to work well, what could be changed next time the lesson is taught, and other specific comments.
  4. 4. Reflection: Each of you will reflect on your performance, summarize peer evaluations and respond to the feedback. This should be very detailed using high levels of reflective thinking. Address questions such as:
What did I do well? What areas do I need to improve?
How was my timing? Did my hook work well? If so, why? If not, why?
What would I change if I did this lesson over?
Were there any surprises in delivering the lesson?
How did I feel? Nervous? Excited? Relaxed? Energized?
How did I think students would respond the lesson?\
How do I think students would respond to the lesson? What would I need to cha ge? Anything? Why? Why not?
Do I agree with the feedback my peers gave me? What did I learn from their critiques? How will that help me in my next teaching assignment?

GRADING CRITERIA
Pico-Teaching
Worth 15 points

PICO TEACHING RUBRIC

Structure
Materials
1
2
3
4

No goals or objectives; no materials; no timing (way over or way under)
Few goals & objectives; few materials; poor timing
Some goals & objectives; some materials; SOLs stated; some construction errors; well timed
Goals and objectives stated; SOLs stated; materials; well constructed; well timed
Lesson Plan





Delivery
Unprofessional dress; unprofessional demeanor; poor vocabulary and grammar; poor voice projection; unrehearsed; poor comprehension
Dress and demeanor questionable; some vocabulary and grammatical errors; unrehearsed
Professionally dressed; few grammatical or vocabulary errors; some voice projection; some comprehension questions
Professionally dressed; proper grammar & vocabulary; professional conduct; strong voice projection; easy to comprehend
Reflection
No reflection on lesson components; no reflection on how to improve lesson; no incorporation of cohort feedback; no reflection on materials or delivery
Little reflection on lesson components; little reflection on how to improve lesson; little incorporation of cohort feedback and materials or delivery
Some reflection on lesson components; some reflection on how to improve lesson, incorporation of cohort feedback and materials or delivery
Reflection on all components of lesson; in-depth discussion on improving lesson; good use of cohort feedback; in-depth reflection on materials and delivery
7. Assignment 7 NANO Teaching


A group of students will teach their classmates. This teaching episode must include the use of technology as an instructional tool. One such technology MUST be the use of the World Wide Web. Nano-Teahing will consist of:
  1. a. Lesson Plan. This lesson plan should be like the plan for Pico-teaching ( but not the same plan) in what it includes , but should also include:
  • Assessment(s) to be incorporated
  • Differentiation
  • The use of technology as an instructional tool
  • An assigned National Primary School Curriculum standard
  • An assigned instructional method from the list below
    • o Jigsaw III 9cooperative learning)
    • o Co-op Co-Co ( Cooperative learning)
    • o Cooperative learning using brainstorming
    • o Think-Pair –Share (cooperative learning)
    • o Inquiry
    • o Dramatic Play
    • o Role playing
    • o Simulation
Give a copy of the lesson plan to the lecturer prior to teaching
  1. b. Nano Teaching. The nano –teaching episode should last no more than 15 mins
  2. c. Evaluation

GRADING CRITERIA
Nano-Teaching
Worth 22 points
NANO TEACHING RUBRIC

Structure
Materials
1
2
3
4

No goals or objectives; no materials; no timing (way over or way under)
Few goals & objectives; few materials; poor timing
Some goals & objectives; some materials; SOLs stated; some construction errors; well timed
Goals and objectives stated; SOLs stated; materials; well constructed; well timed
Technology

No form of technology use as an aid
Use of technology but was not a significant teaching aid
Use of technology as a teaching aid, to help clarify some aspects of the content
Effective use of technology as a teaching aid
Delivery
Unprofessional dress; unprofessional demeanor; poor vocabulary and grammar; poor voice projection; unrehearsed; poor comprehension
Dress and demeanor questionable; some vocabulary and grammatical errors; unrehearsed
Professionally dressed; few grammatical or vocabulary errors; some voice projection; some comprehension questions
Professionally dressed; proper grammar & vocabulary; professional conduct; strong voice projection; easy to comprehend
Reflection
No reflection on lesson components; no reflection on how to improve lesson; no incorporation of cohort feedback; no reflection on materials or delivery
Little reflection on lesson components; little reflection on how to improve lesson; little incorporation of cohort feedback and materials or delivery
Some reflection on lesson components; some reflection on how to improve lesson, incorporation of cohort feedback and materials or delivery
Reflection on all components of lesson; in-depth discussion on improving lesson; good use of cohort feedback; in-depth reflection on materials and delivery

8. Assignment 8: Microteaching – Due Date: Week #, (specific date)During enrollment in ESOC 2152 Social Studies Methods for the Primary Classroom, candidates are required to design and teach a lesson in a simulated classroom setting. Candidates are assessed on their planning and teaching skills. The activity is inclusive of self evaluation and reflection and peer evaluation and feedback. The detailed lesson plan is expected to be student-centered with active participation, and be aligned to national content standards.
GRADING CRITERIA:
Micro Teaching
Worth 10%
Microteaching Lesson Plan Rubric
Criterion
Level 1 Unacceptable Performance
Level 2
Emerging Performance
Level 3
Expected Performance
Level 4
Excellent Performance
Lesson Plan
objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes rarely

Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes most of the time
Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes all of the time
Lesson Plan Material
objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes rarely

Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes most of the time
Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes all of the time
Lesson Plan Procedure
objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes rarely

Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes most of the time
Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes all of the time
Lesson- Guiding Questions
objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes rarely

Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes most of the time
Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes all of the time
Lesson Plan- Standards Alignment
objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes rarely

Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes most of the time
Lesson objectives clearly stated in terms of student outcomes all of the time

Microteaching Lesson presentation Rubric
Criterion
Level 1 Unacceptable Performance
Level 2
Emerging Performance
Level 3
Expected Performance
Level 5
Excellent Performance
Presentation—Introduction
Lesson introduction engages the learners rarely.

Lesson introduction engages the learners most of the time.
Lesson introduction engages the learners all of the time.
Presentation--Classroom Organization
Lesson pacing and classroom structure support the lesson rarely.

Lesson pacing and classroom structure support the lesson most of the time.
Lesson pacing and classroom structure support the lesson all of the time.
Presentation--Student-Centered Activity
Lesson provides for active student involvement rarely.

Lesson provides for active student involvement most of the time.
Lesson pacing and classroom structure support the lesson all of the time.
Presentation--Knowledge of Subject
Lesson demonstrates knowledge of subject matter being taught rarely.

Lesson demonstrates knowledge of subject matter being taught most of the time.
Lesson demonstrates knowledge of subject matter being taught all of the time.
Presentation—Enthusiasm
Instruction reflects passion for teaching rarely.

Instruction reflects passion for teaching most of the time.
Instruction reflects passion for teaching all of the time
Presentation—Closure
Lesson is brought to a definitive close rarely.

Lesson is brought to a definitive close most of the time.
Lesson is brought to a definitive close all of the time.
Teaching Skills—Praise
Praise is used appropriately rarely.

Praise is used appropriately most of the time.
Praise is used appropriately all of the time.
Teaching Skills--Feedback to Students
Feedback is specific, timely, and accurate rarely.

Feedback is specific, timely, and accurate most of the time
Feedback is specific, timely, and accurate all of the time.
Teaching Skills--Nonverbal Behavior
Nonverbal behavior is used to maintain a positive classroom environment rarely.

Nonverbal behavior is used to maintain a positive classroom environment most of the time.
Nonverbal behavior is used to maintain a positive classroom environment all of the time.
Teaching Skills—Questioning
Students are engaged in higher level questioning which encourages participation rarely

Students are engaged in higher level questioning which encourages participation most of the time.
Students are engaged in higher level questioning which encourages participation most of the time.
Teaching Skills--Checks for Understanding
Teacher monitors understanding as lesson progresses rarely.

Teacher monitors understanding as lesson progresses most of the time.
Teacher monitors understanding as lesson progresses most of the time.
Reflection--Self Evaluation
Self reflection exhibits understanding of strengths and weaknesses rarely.

Self reflection exhibits understanding of strengths and weaknesses most of the time.
Self reflection exhibits understanding of strengths and weaknesses all of the time.
Reflection—Collaboration
Collaboration reflects a shared ownership of the lesson rarely

Collaboration reflects a shared ownership of the lesson most of the time.
Collaboration reflects a shared ownership of the lesson all of the time.



9 Assignment 9 : Service-Learning

Service-Learning is a teaching method that combines academic instruction, meaningful service, and critical reflective thinking to enhance student learning and civic responsibility. In order to promote civic responsibility, volunteerism and self- efficacy, students will be working on a specific project that will benefit the community/society. They will write a reflection paper documenting their experiences in the service

GRADING CRITERIA:
Service Learning
Worth 15%




Strong Impact
Good Impact
Some Impact
Minimal
Impact
1. Meet actual
community
needs
Determined by
current research
conducted or
discovered by
youth with
educator’s
assistance where
appropriate
Determined by
past research
discovered by
youth with
educator’s
assistance where
appropriate
Determined by
making a guess
at what
community
needs are
Community
needs secondary
to what a project
the educator
wants to do;
project considers
only student
needs
2. Are
coordinated in
collaboration
with
community
Active, direct
collaboration
with community
by the educator
and/or youth
Community
members act as
consultants in
the project
development
Community
members are
informed of the
project directly
Community
members are
coincidentally
informed or not
knowledgeable
at all
3. Are
integrated into
curriculum
Service-learning
as an
instructional
strategy with
content/service
components
integrated
Service-learning
as a teaching
technique with
content/service
components
concurrent
Service-learning
part of
curriculum or
project work but
sketchy
connections,
with emphasis
on service
A service project
or good deed not
tied to learning
4. Facilitate
active student
reflection
Youth think,
share, produce
reflective
products
individually and
as group
members
Youth think,
share, produce
group reflection
Youth share
individual
reflective
projects
Reflection is
just a summary
of events
5. Use new
skill/knowledge
in real world
settings
All youth have
direct
application of
new skill or
knowledge in
community
service
All youth have
some active
application of
new skill or
knowledge
Some youth
more involved
than others or
little community
service
involvement
Knowledge used
mostly in the
classroom or
project work;
no active
community
service
6. Help develop
sense of caring
for and about
others
Reflections
show growth
regarding self in
community and
the importance
of service
Reflections
show generic
growth
regarding the
importance of
community
service
Reflections
restricted to pros
and cons of
particular
service project
regarding the
community
Reflections
limited to self centered
pros
and cons of the
service project
7. Improve
quality of life
for person(s)
served
Facilitate change
or insight; solve
a problem; meet
a need or
address an issue
Changes
enhance an
already good
community
situation
Changes mainly
decorative, but
new and unique
benefits realized
in community
Changes mainly
decorative, but
limited
community
benefit, or are
not new and
unique








9. Assignment 9: Electronic Portfolio (Exam)– Due Date: Week 16, (specific date)
Student will put together all their artifacts of the course work and activities in an electronic portfolio using Wiki spaces. This portfolio will include a table of content, cover letter (APA), and resume, selected work from the course, social studies, etc
GRADING CRITERIA:
Socratic Seminars
Worth points

CATEGORY
Exemplary
Proficient
Partially Proficient
Incomplete
POINTS
Selection of Artifacts
9 points
6 points
3 points
0 points

checkbox
checkbox
All artifacts and work samples are clearly and directly related to the purpose of the e-portfolio.
checkbox
checkbox
Most artifacts and work samples are related to the purpose of the e-portfolio.
checkbox
checkbox
Few artifacts and work samples are related to the purpose of the e-portfolio.
checkbox
checkbox
Most artifacts and work samples are unrelated to the purpose of the e-portfolio.








Reflections
9 points
6 points
3 points
0 points

checkbox
checkbox
All reflections clearly describe why artifacts in the e-portfolio demonstrate achievement of each standard or goal and include goals for continued learning.
checkbox
checkbox
Most of the reflections describe why artifacts in the e-portfolio demonstrate achievement of each standard or goal and include goals for future learning.
checkbox
checkbox
A few reflections describe why artifacts in the e-portfolio demonstrate achievement of each standard or goal and include goals for future learning.
checkbox
checkbox
No reflections describe why artifacts in the e-portfolio demonstrate achievement of each standard or goal and do not include goals for future learning.
checkbox
checkbox
All reflections illustrate the ability to effectively critique work and provide suggestions for constructive practical alternatives.
checkbox
checkbox
Most of the reflections illustrate the ability to effectively critique work and provide suggestions for constructive practical alternatives.
checkbox
checkbox
A few reflections illustrate the ability to effectively critique work and provide suggestions for constructive practical alternatives.
checkbox
checkbox
No reflections illustrate the ability to effectively critique work or provide suggestions for constructive practical alternatives.
















Use of Multimedia
9 points
6 points
3 points
0 points

checkbox
checkbox
All of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video enhance reflective statements, create interest, and are appropriate examples of one or more standards.
checkbox
checkbox
Most of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video enhance reflective statements, create interest, and are appropriate examples of one or more standards.
checkbox
checkbox
A few of the photographs, graphics, sound and/or video are inappropriate and do not enhance reflective statements or create interest, and are inappropriate examples of one or more standards.
checkbox
checkbox
The photographs, graphics, sounds, and/or videos are inappropriate, do not enhance reflective statements, and are inappropriate examples of one or more standards or are distracting decorations that detract from the content.
checkbox
checkbox
All audio and/or video files are edited with proper voice projection, appropriate language, and clear delivery.
checkbox
checkbox
Most of the audio and/or video files are edited with proper voice projection, appropriate language, and clear delivery.
checkbox
checkbox
A few of the audio and/or video files are edited with inconsistent clarity or sound (too loud/too soft/garbled).
checkbox
checkbox
Audio and/or video files are not edited or exhibit inconsistent clarity or sound (too loud/too soft/garbled).
checkbox
checkbox
Information is included concerning the size of the files when providing links to images, sounds, movies, or other files.
checkbox
checkbox
Information is included concerning the size of most of the files when providing links to images, sounds, movies, or other files.
checkbox
checkbox
Information is included concerning the size of a few of the files when providing links to images, sounds, movies, or other files.
checkbox
checkbox
No information is included concerning the size of files when providing links to images, sounds, movies, or other files.




























































Creativity
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points

checkbox
checkbox
Creativity and original ideas enhance the content of the e-portfolio in an innovative way
checkbox
checkbox
Most of the files show use of creativity and original ideas to enhance the content of the e-portfolio.
checkbox
checkbox
Some use of creativity or original ideas is evident that enhances the content of the e-portfolio.
checkbox
checkbox
No use of creativity or original ideas is evident that enhances the content of the e-portfolio.
























Layout and Text Elements
6 points
4 points
2 points
0 points

checkbox
checkbox
The e-portfolio is easy to read with appropriate use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and sub-headings.
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checkbox
The e-portfolio is generally easy to read with appropriate use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and sub-headings.
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The e-portfolio is often difficult to read due to inappropriate use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and sub-headings.
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The e-portfolio is difficult to read due to inappropriate use of fonts, point size, bullets, italics, bold, and indentations for headings and sub-headings.
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The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately.
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The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately in most places.
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The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space inappropriately in some places.
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The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space inappropriately and the content appears cluttered.
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The background and colors enhance the readability of the text.
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The background and colors enhance the readability of the text in most places.
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The background and colors are distracting in some places and decrease the readability of the text.
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The background and colors are distracting and decrease the readability of the text.




























































Annotations
3 points
2 points
1 point
0 points

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Each artifact is accompanied by a caption that articulately explains the importance of that particular work including title, author, date, and description of the importance of the artifact.
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Most of the artifacts are accompanied by a caption that articulately explains the importance of that particular work including title, author, date, and description of the importance of the artifact.
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Some of the artifacts are accompanied by a caption that articulately explains the importance of that particular work including title, author, date, and description of the importance of the artifact.
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None of the artifacts are accompanied by a caption that articulately explains the importance of that particular work including title, author, date, and description of the importance of the artifact.
Writing Mechanics
3 points
2 points
1 point
0 points

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The text has no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
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The text has a few errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. These require minor editing and revision.
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The text has errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling requiring editing and revision.

(4 or more errors)
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The text has many errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling requiring major editing and revision.

(more than 6 errors)
































TOTAL POINTS
/45
© COPYRIGHT 2003-2008 Joan Vandervelde

All Rights Reserved.
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References
On-Line Sources: